Friday, August 23, 2013

Cleaning ‘Minnow’


 

 

Before I could clean the interior of ‘Minnow’, I had to remove a Campa Potti from the forepeak. I noticed it was much bigger than a Porta Potti my family took camping last year. If ever I cruise ‘Minnow’ on inland waterways I shall take the Pota Potti, but for estuary and coastal sailing I shall rely on the well tested, ‘bucket and chuck it’ routine.

I vacuum cleaned the whole of the interior of ‘Minnow’ and I hosed and scrubbed her exterior. She’s not exactly shining like a new pin, but when I’ve attended to a few blemishes and painted her, she will look a lot smarter.

The mainsail is badly chafed at the head and foot where it comes into contact with the mast. The boom fitting for the mainsheet and topping lift is rusty, but structurally strong. Parts of the cabin top are coming adrift and the aft end requires sealing to the deck.

I found nine fenders and one strange anchor with a chain, plus thirty-eight metres of three-stranded nylon warp. Untangling the warp took over half-an-hour!

I think I shall be able to sort out the leaks at the top and bottom of the drain pipe that allows water to exit from the base of mast box through the bottom of the boat. The mast box requires sealing either side of the aft panel. The blocks for the steering system have to be replaced, because they do not run smoothly. The vent cover in the transom will require sealing, and the yuloh rowlock has seized. There are certain refinements that I can do to make things run more smoothly; for example, I can replace the rudder up-haul line with a thicker one. She does not have the standard metal loops for stowing the yuloh and the sail.

While cleaning the boat I noticed several things I shall want to improve. She does not have an outboard bracket. Her previous owner managed without an engine, but I have to contend with very strong tides on the River Crouch and the Thames Estuary; therefore I shall be tempted to fit a bracket for my Honda 2 HP outboard.

Note re. Sean's Comment

Sean wanted to know how the mainsheet can be led into the boat to avoid fouling the engine. This arrangement on 'Faith' partly solves the problem. Jim says it's OK, providing he keeps an eye on things.

 

6 comments:

Sean Mulligan said...

Bill...

I am very curious about what you will use, and have used, for a motor bracket. I have acquired a 2hp Honda for "Scout" but as of yet have not decided how best to mount it. I believe I remember you or someone indicating that the mainsheet needs to be run differently when the motor is on board. My mainsheet currently is run as per the plans. I plan on sometimes sailing with not motor, but want the option to mount it for longer trips and waters with tide and current.

Sean

richard green said...

Hello Bill, I had to permit myself a little smile when you mentioned the state the anchor warp was in. It looks as if the previous owner learned how to flake a rope from his Missis, with her washing line. You certainly got a nice lot of fenders with her. I share your sentiments regarding chemical toilets, and much prefer the bucket and chuckit, it's also more environmentally friendly than throwing formalin based chemicals away wherever.
I hope the threatened/promised inclement weather doesn't put you off doing a bit more tomorrow, and letting us know about it.

William Serjeant said...

Sean,

Jim who owns 'Faith', and Pete who owns 'Johanna' lead the mainsheet from the aft deck, but this does not entirely keep the sheet free from snarling the engine. Apparently it is better than having the sheet from the transom.

If you are a member of the Yahoo! Paradox Builders Group, have a look at the undermentioned link on the topic of engines for Paradox:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/paradoxbuilders/message/7570

Cheers,
Bill.

William Serjeant said...

Richard,

Coiling a long three-stranded rope can result in twists, unless the coils are held in the left hand and they are coiled clockwise. I find it is better to break it up into hanks of about 12 metres. Therefore a 30 metre rope will be divided into 3 hanks. If one end of the rope is fixed, start coiling from that end and remove twists as you go.

Cheers,
Bill.

William Serjeant said...

Sean,

I've added a photo of the sheeting arrangement on 'Faith'.

The sheet is attached to the transom on the port side, passes through a block on the end of the boom, and enters an eye through the aft deck on the starboard side.

I don't know where the sheet goes from there - perhaps through a pulley to a jam cleat.

Cheers,
Bill.

Sean Mulligan said...

Thanks Bill! :-) Just got off duty for the next four days. I plan on getting a fair amount done on Scout while I am off and we have a huge front working it's way through our area bringing us unusually cool temps and precip. I really appreciate the photos and info!