Wednesday, December 04, 2013

‘Minnow’s’ Yuloh – Part 6





 
I don’t know what the temperature was this morning, but it was cold enough to stop me working on ‘Minnow’s’ yuloh. As I suffer from Reynard’s phenomenon, the circulation of blood in my fingers was inadequate, causing them to go white and to feel numb. However, in the afternoon the temperature rose, so that I was able to experiment with the pivot pin.

I wanted to work out where best to mount the stainless steel pin. Matt’s plan shows it to be on the starboard side embedded in the aft deck. If it is not close enough to the edge of the deck, it is possible for the yuloh to come into contact with the deck. If my memory serves me correctly, I have seen a yuloh pin embedded in a wooden block attached to the top of the transom. The upper surface of the block was angled away from the horizontal to rake the pin aft. This arrangement had the advantage of keeping the yuloh clear of the deck and setting the pin at right angles to the shaft of the yuloh when the yuloh was in its operative position.

Hopefully, with more time to think things through, I’ll be able to decide what will be best.

6 comments:

richard green said...

Hello Bill, I haven't messaged you for a while, but I'm still following your blog.
Did you have to get the stainless pin made up especially?
The Reynaud's syndrome looks rather unpleasant to say the least. I hope it doesn't limit your sailing too much.

Sean Mulligan said...

That is a darn nice pin you made there. I resorted to buying 5" stainless lag bolt. I then cut the head of it off and used a die to cut machine threads into what was the bolt's shoulder. Then I purchased some Brass threaded sphere's off of ebay and threaded the sphere onto the lag bolt. It's nowhere near as clean or I am sure long lasting as yours. I can however unthread the sphere and thread a new one on when it wears out. Geeze ...I hope I don't have to yuloh enough to wear it out too soon! LOL

William Serjeant said...

Richard,

I had the pin made for me from a solid piece of stainless steel. It was turned on a lathe.

I've suffered all my life with Reynaud's syndrome. Strangely it rarely affects me when sailing, but I avoid the colder months.

Cheers,
Bill.

William Serjeant said...

Sean,

From accounts, you have done a fair amount of yulohing. Did you find any snags?

I've never had much success with it, but that may have partly been due to a poor yuloh. The present owner of 'Faith' modified it by imparting curve to the shaft. He gets on with it pretty well, and seldom resorts to using the outboard.
Cheers,
Bill.

Sean Mulligan said...

Bill...I am still a rank rookie at yulohing....but I can maintain close to 2 knots. My yulohs foil is backwards though so I hope to increase the speed when I correct this.

No real "snags" to report, however, I find that there is a real technique which I am still learning. I can now most often do the falling leaf stroke without having to use a retaining strap to keep the yuloh on the pin....but if I fall out of sync for evven a second and tip the blades leading edge the wrong way...it lifts right off. That is frustrating...but I guess just a learning curve. My yuloh does not have near the curvature yours does. Make me wonder about doing something similar to what you have done.

I must admit...I cheat and use the rudder to help me steer while I yuloh. I find getting the bow to turn do-able but a lot of work. I have a tiller extension that beings the tiller into the cabin and allows me to just nudge it right or left as necessary while yulohing or paddling. I find the stand up paddle board paddle a great propulsion tool as well, and much easier to master.

William Serjeant said...

Sean,

Al who owns 'Little Jim' is an expert with the yuloh. I note that whenever I've seen him yulohing, he had the rudder retracted.

Steering is done by shunting the stern - harder and stronger strokes on the appropriate side to keep the boat on a steady course.

This is a bit like double-bladed canoeing. To compensate for the turning force generated by the wind, the paddler must stroke harder on one side of the canoe.

Cheers,
Bill.